Finding the answers.



To answer these two questions, I tapped into the resource pool at Queen’s School of Business, Canada’s oldest and premier school. At Queen’s I have taught and developed the first BComm sales course, helped lead the executive education programs in sales and marketing management, and have conceived a plan for Canada’s first university-based Institute for Sales Excellence to be hosted by Queen’s School of Business.

With over 12,000 alumni, Queen’s School of Business has more degree and executive development program grads than all other Canadian business schools. Queen’s also has the highest entrance standards of all Canadian business schools. This means we have talented grads working in all major companies and organizations, in all sectors, around the world. Clearly this is a powerful resource base from which to conduct sales research.

Over the past decade, I have interviewed and worked with hundreds of male and female professionals who were either working in sales, had worked in sales, had managed sales teams, or were about to assume sales leadership roles. And these people came from seven groups:

1) Those enrolled in Queen’s one-week executive development Sales Management Program offered twice a year in Kingston;

2) Those enrolled in Queen’s one-week executive development Marketing Management Program offered twice a year in Kingston;

3) Those who contracted Queen’s Executive Development Centre to provide customized management training (e.g., CRM, Sales Compensation Systems);

4) Those who had graduated from Queen’s Accelerated MBA graduate degree program;

5) Those who had graduated from, Queen’s MBA for Science and Technology graduate degree program;

6) Those who had graduated from Queen’s Executive MBA graduate degree program; and

7) Those who had graduated from Queen’s BComm undergraduate degree.